Addiction can be often described as a time of isolation for many. Substances such as opium, stimulants, depressants, and hallucinogens exist to ease pain, including potential stress, relationship problems, and physical problems.

Furthermore, in an ironic twist, drug abuse causes more problems and makes addicts feel shameful of their addiction. This perpetuates the cycle of addiction and encourages addicts to continue abusing drugs and ultimately further distance themselves. In time, perhaps addicts begin to even loathe spending time with family or friends and not on recreational drug abuse.

In truth, human beings are social animals that need social interaction and love to properly function in everyday life. Isolation not only further drives addicts deeper into addiction, but also tears apart families. Instead of simply achieving sobriety, addicts must focus on reconnecting and socializing with others to heal.

The Effects of Addiction on Others

Amid the struggles of addiction, addicts may become completely unaware of their actions and how they might hurt others. They might push others away, abuse them physically or emotionally, neglect their responsibilities, pets, or even children. Due to this, addiction as a condition affects more than just the addict but everyone around them.

In some of these cases, the isolation addicts deal with may not be completely voluntary but triggered by their actions. Friends or family that feel they may be in danger must take care of themselves first and avoid dangerous addicts; nevertheless, they should still be open to providing support once an addict’s addiction and their actions are under better control.

Initially, this isolation makes addicts feel alone and helpless, and ultimately trapped in their addiction. First and foremost, addicts must seek help through professionals—only then can they begin to receive proper support from family.

Recovering as a Social Body

Drug addiction segregates addicts in more ways than through their own actions, but the consequences of our culture. When a person is caught with an addiction, especially to illegal substances, they are not helped but punished by society. They may be arrested, which then is permanently recorded and can hurt a person’s livelihood forever. Perhaps they get fired from their current job and then fail to find a new one due to this permanent record.

Many new possible problems may arise for these addicts: they fall into a divorce, are disowned, or ignored entirely as a liability. In many ways, addicts are forever punished for a single mistake and often have little support backing them moving forward. Rather than shunning addicts for their mistakes, they should be given as much emotional support as possible. Whether through family, friends, or professionals, social contact is crucial in healing the human mind, body, and spirit.

As social animals, a person’s instinct to bond to someone or something to cope with recurring problems and stress. Unfortunately, some will use an addiction to drugs, gambling, food, or other substances to bond with instead. Ideally, what an addict should be doing is seeking a person for this attachment to overcome the problems in their lives. By pushing the importance of relationships, addicts can not only properly transition and heal from addiction but avoid it entirely.

If you or a loved one is struggling with drug or alcohol addiction, contact a Discovery Place‘s Treatment & Rehab alternative in Tennessee. You might be interested in Discovery Place’s own treatment center alternatives, such as our 30 Day Residential Addiction Alternative Recovery Program or our Long Term Alternative Recovery Program in Burns, Tennessee. Call us for a free consultation at 1-800-725-0922.

Testimonials

  • Discovery Place was the answer for my son. He did the 90 day and then the step down program and sober living. We give this organization 10 stars. They met my son where he was …emotionally, mentally, physically. They helped him put his life back on track. Discovery Place employees care about their guests. If your son, brother, nephew, grandson or husband needs excellent supportive care THIS is indeed the facility.

    Kim Morton
    Alumni Parent
  • I have remained sober and it is because of DP. DP is the best place there is, hands down. I keep everyone there in my prayers, and I encourage everyone there to take what they are practicing and do it in their lives, after.

    Roy Mantelli
    Alumni
  • Over the past year, I’ve been putting into actin what Discovery Place taught me, and I have experienced a complete perspective change of the world, and the people in it. I get to be a man of service and love today, and for that I am grateful to Discovery Place.

    Matt Kassay
    Alumni
  • Discovery Place means the world to me. They showed me the tools that I’ve tried to use everyday in my life to think less often of myself, and more frequently of others. I am learning to lend a hand when I am able and to have a honest and humble relationship with God and the people around me. Not only am I clean and sober, but also I am happy and fulfilled.

    Tommy Parker
    Alumni
  • Discovery Place and the men who work there made recovery attractive, and more importantly, fun. There is strength in the struggle. I am forever grateful for my time at Discovery Place.

    Creed McClellan
    Alumni
  • When I got to Discovery Place my whole life was in shambles, but I didn’t know it. I spent 6 months in their programs, participating in all three phases, and was met with kindness and love all along the way. It is unbelievable to me, where I am now relative to where I was when I arrived at DP.

    Lance Duke
    Alumni
  • I can never say enough good things about Discovery Place and the people who work there. Before checking in to DP, I was out of options and out of answers. Fortunately, Discovery Place has a solution. Taking suggestions from the staff at DP saved my life, and as a result, I’m now more content and hopeful about life. I’m grateful for Discovery Place showing me how to live a healthy life so that I can become a better man and help the next guy.”

    Tyler Buckingham
    Alumni

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